By Hobie Anthony




Enter the world of Silverfish, where a young man attempts to discover his identity amidst a world of increasing isolation and horror. His basement room is full of wires, rats, and silverfish. He doesn’t know his name or where he came from, only that he is the caretaker in a house of drugs, sex, and mindless violence.

The Caretaker finds himself in the middle of a horrible, slithering conspiracy that threatens all of humanity. He finds that he is its unwitting accomplice. Without it, he would not have a home.

He enters a romance with Olwyn, a young woman ravaged by drugs and the menace of LaMore, the man who runs the house and supplies her drugs. Suddenly, she makes things less clear, a choice must be made. They will soon uncover a terrible secret which threatens all of humanity.

Silverfish, the title piece in Hobie Anthony’s first full-length novel in stories, offers a wide-angle glimpse under the microscope of Anthony’s singularly unsettled vision of the world.

With taut language and gritty description, readers will be wrapped tight by the tentacles in the story. This is literary fiction with an edge, language that’ll bite you back.


ISBN: 978-0999621578

Publication date: 19 December 2017

Paperback price: $15


"Silverfish is elegant and compelling with echoes of Gibson, Dick, and Mieville, but it's entirely its own thing. Hobie Anthony is an author of exhilarating originality and unsettling vision."

– Barry Graham, author of The Book of Man and When It All Comes Down to Dust

This was among the best books I read in 2017. It is constantly moving, very engaging. Besides the brilliance of the irony of a seedy, dark story being set in Portland, Oregon, the characters are fascinating, such that you can feel empathy for them while you shake your head, entertained or horrified. The rapid short sentences give the story a constant vangoghian vibration. I have never tried cocaine or acid, but I could experience it vicariously through the restlessness of the persons in the story. The structure of the narrative offers various surprises. It is ultramodern yet not pretentiously avant-garde. In among the simple-worded short sentences, there are gems of expressive beauty, like: "My consciousness rattles around like a maid in a mansion." Highly recommended!

– Travis Chaney